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Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)

Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
Feature New Record
DESCRIPTION
Intrusion Detection System (IDS) are devices or software applications that monitor network or system activities for malicious activities or policy violations and send reports to a management station.
An IDS inspects all inbound and outbound network activity and identifies suspicious patterns that may indicate a network or system attack from someone attempting to break into or compromise a system. There are several ways to categorize an IDS. First, misuse detection vs. anomaly detection. In misuse detection, the IDS analyzes the information it gathers and compares it to large databases of attack signatures to search for a specific attack that has already been documented. Misuse detection software is only as good as the database of attack signatures that it uses. In anomaly detection, the system administrator defines the baseline state of the network's traffic load, protocol, and typical packet size.

The anomaly detector monitors network segments to compare their state to the normal baseline and look for anomalies. Second, network-based vs. host-based systems. In a network-based system (NIDS) the individual packets flowing through a network are analyzed. The NIDS can detect malicious packets that are designed to be overlooked by a firewall's filtering rules. In a host-based system, the IDS examines at the activity on each individual computer or host. Finally, passive system vs. reactive systems. In a passive system, the IDS detects a potential security breach, logs the information and signals an alert. In a reactive system, the IDS responds to the suspicious activity by logging off a user or by reprogramming the firewall to block network traffic from the suspected malicious source.

ID systems are being developed in response to the increasing number of attacks on major sites and networks, including those of the Pentagon, the White House, NATO, and the U.S. Defense Department. The safeguarding of security is becoming increasingly difficult, because the possible technologies of attack are becoming ever more sophisticated; at the same time, less technical ability is required for the novice attacker, because proven past methods are easily accessed through the Web.

Typically, an ID system follows a two-step process. The first procedures are host-based and are considered the passive component, these include: inspection of the system's configuration files to detect inadvisable settings; inspection of the password files to detect inadvisable passwords; and inspection of other system areas to detect policy violations. The second procedures are network-based and are considered the active component: mechanisms are set in place to reenact known methods of attack and to record system responses.

Intrusion detection functions include:
- Monitoring and analyzing both user and system activities
- Analyzing system configurations and vulnerabilities
- Assessing system and file integrity
- Ability to recognize patterns typical of attacks
- Analysis of abnormal activity patterns
- Tracking user policy violations

Passive and reactive systems:
In a passive system, the intrusion detection system (IDS) sensor detects a potential security breach, logs the information and signals an alert on the console or owner. In a reactive system, also known as an intrusion prevention system (IPS), the IPS auto-responds to the suspicious activity by resetting the connection or by reprogramming the firewall to block network traffic from the suspected malicious source. The term IDPS is commonly used where this can happen automatically or at the command of an operator; systems that both "detect (alert)" and "prevent".

Comparison with firewalls:
Though they both relate to network security, an intrusion detection system (IDS) differs from a firewall in that a firewall looks outwardly for intrusions in order to stop them from happening. Firewalls limit access between networks to prevent intrusion and do not signal an attack from inside the network. An IDS evaluates a suspected intrusion once it has taken place and signals an alarm. An IDS also watches for attacks that originate from within a system. This is traditionally achieved by examining network communications, identifying heuristics and patterns (often known as signatures) of common computer attacks, and taking action to alert operators. A system that terminates connections is called an intrusion prevention system, and is another form of an application layer firewall.

Key vendors: IBM, Juniper Networks, McAfee, Suricata
MARKET SIZE

The perimeter intrusion detection systems market was valued at USD 9.52 billion in 2017 and is projected to reach USD 21.75 billion by 2023, at a CAGR of 15.2% during the forecast period.

Source: marketsandmarkets

The perimeter intrusion detection systems market is expected to grow from USD 4.12 billion in 2016 to USD 5.82 billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.1% during the forecast period.

Source: researchandmarkets

According to Fact.MR, the global intrusion, detection and prevention system market is expected to grow over USD 11.5 billion by the end of 2026.

Source: Fact.MR

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